I think that any work put together by an artist or writer should be credited accordingly, only if that person puts his own word in or reveals a voice. The requirement stating that, “The U.S. Copyright Act only protects expression that is “original,” that is expression that exhibits at least some minimal amount of “creative” content contributed by the author or creator,” is a justifiable requirement. I agree with the fact that you must add some kind of creativity to any work that you produce in order to put your name on it. Although I agree with this, I also think that the line drawn between what is creative and what isn’t becomes very thin. In order to have your work credited you must be able to back-up your work with concrete evidence and also cite all borrowed works accordingly. A person that creates a white-pages phone book is putting a varying amount of effort into making a useful resource but in order to credit his work he must prove that his idea and his work belonged to him. This is what I mean when I say that the justifying line between what is original and unoriginal becomes thin. Giving proof of his creativity become impossible for such a task. Although this becomes inconvenient to some people that put in hard work with great ideas, I can’t think of a better way to justify giving anyone credibility.

When it comes to the work I’ve been doing in this class on my portfolio I believe that I should be given credit for the work I am doing. Granting I have drawn information from other written works, my voice is skewered throughout my product. Because I add to my work, giving it a creative twist and an original input, I deserve credit. After reading Uncreative Writing: Managing Language in the Digital Age, I began to settle with Kenneth Goldsmith when he states that “most of what is in The Arcades Project was not written by Benjamin, rather it was simply copied texts.” But because each entry is properly cited, and Benjamin’s own “voice” inserts itself with brilliant gloss and commentary on what’s being copied it deserves credibility.

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